I was given steroids for surgery recently, and now have not been able to lower my blood sugar below 300. Could there be a connection?

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I had surgery about two weeks ago and they gave me some small steroids to help with any kind of infections. I have not been able to get my blood sugar down below 300 without completely stopping eating and giving myself a short acting insulin. Does it take time to rid my body of steroids?

Q: I had surgery about two weeks ago and they gave me some small steroids to help with any kind of infections. I have not been able to get my blood sugar down below 300 without completely stopping eating and giving myself a short acting insulin. Does it take time to rid my body of steroids?

I'm sorry to hear that your blood sugar levels have been so high following your steroid injection. Although prednisone and other steroids are often necessary post-surgery to protect against infection and inflammation, they can make blood sugar control very difficult. After steroids have been discontinued, blood sugar levels should normalize within a few days to several weeks, depending on the individual. Even though your blood sugar is elevated, you should still be eating regular meals. The key is to choose foods that have a minimal effect on blood sugar, such as protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese), nonstarchy vegetables (most types other than corn, peas, lima beans, and carrots), and healthy fats (olive oil, coconut oil, butter).

Answered By dLife Expert: Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE

Certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian living in Southern California.

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