My 18-year-old daughter was diagnosed 4 months ago with type 1 diabetes. She is in the honeymoon phase. Are there any interventions that can prolong this phase?

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My 18-year-old daughter was diagnosed 4 months ago with type 1 diabetes. She is in the honeymoon phase. Are there any interventions that can prolong this phase?

Q: My 18-year-old daughter was diagnosed 4 months ago with type 1 diabetes. She is in the honeymoon phase. Are there any interventions that can prolong this phase?

The “honeymoon phase” refers to the period that occurs shortly after being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, when the beta cells of the pancreas continue to produce some insulin, although in smaller than normal amounts.

Although there are several factors that influence the duration of this phase, keeping blood sugar well controlled is key. Studies suggest that beta cell function may be preserved by taking amounts of basal insulin and checking blood sugar levels regularly to ensure that they are staying within target range.

One study found that exercising regularly may help prolong the honeymoon phase. In addition, following a very-low-carb diet can help prevent blood sugar from rising at mealtimes, which may also help preserve beta cell function. Other clinical trials are looking at additional ways to prolonging the honeymoon phase, including treatment with antibodies and other compounds that boost the immune system.

Answered by Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE

Answered By dLife Expert: Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE

Certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian living in Southern California.

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